Scolded Heart

Once…..

His cadenced, wistful, trusting heart
vowed amaranthine fidelity
pending only her quiescent antiphon

     ….TSKtsk…..TSKtsk…..TSKtsk…..

Our” coalescent trice…..
Our” coherent jiff…..
Our” conjoined breaths…..
Our” onliest destiny…..

Witnessed betwixt a duet of
amorphous, ensorcelled realms…..

The Azure Dragon
      Qinglong     Seiryū     Cheongnyong     Thanh Long
The White Tiger
      Baihu     Byakko     Baekho     Bạch Hổ

Cautioned afore, was I
Excessively emboldened, I became
Prior exhortations, I scorned
Supremely confident, I embarked

Only to have embraced…..

…..a Wraith

     …..tskTSK…..tskTSK…..tskTSK…..

Blame not the Scolders…..

Gallery bystanders anchored in awe
silently bandaged their veracious perceptions
loathe to waste any shredded weave
original of mine own infatuated garments

Remnants of my scolded heart
whispering breathlessly
skipping only to a muted, abandoned rhythm

     ….TsKtSk…..TsKtSk…..TsKtSk…..

Her familiar entitlement merely punctuates
His Dragon’s share of horror and hallelujah

I willingly accept all unanticipated burdens
now my weight to bear

My Integrity….. intact
   ergo…..

I zestfully gaze upon dawning sanguine horizons

Now, solo patience nurtures abundant clarity
Now, is so very near…..

Apprentice once more! HUZZAH!

Dare I shyly serenade afresh…..
…..hopeful of an unwritten concerto?

 Heart beats…..
   Hearts beat…..

     Heartbeats…..

     ….. tsktsk…..tsktsk…..  …..lubdub…..LUBDUB…..

Lesson learned…..
A silhouetted silence casts the darkest shadow

___________________________________________________________
… and if I may, I chose to include the following background history of ‘scold‘, as I was delighted to learn of this, after I completed these recent scratchings! Unintentional irony – the best kind!

Word History: A scold is not usually a poet and a scolding rarely sounds like poetry to the one being scolded, but it seems that the word scold has a poetic background. It is probable that scold, first recorded in Middle English in a work probably composed around 1150, has a Scandinavian source related to the Old Icelandic word skld, “poet.” Middle English scolde may in fact mean “a minstrel,” but of that we are not sure. However, its Middle English meanings, “a ribald abusive person” and “a shrewish chiding woman,” may be related to skld, as shown by the senses of some of the Old Icelandic words derived from skld. Old Icelandic skldskapr, for example, meant “poetry” in a good sense but also “a libel in verse,” while skld-stöng meant “a pole with imprecations or charms scratched on it.” It would seem that libelous cursing verse was a noted part of at least some poets’ productions and that this association with poets passed firmly along with the Scandinavian borrowing into English.

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10 thoughts on “Scolded Heart

  1. Thank you for such beautiful words. We all have within us, the gentle strength of a redemptive heart.

  2. I hope not too shy to continue posting your poetry!

    • I am ever so slowly, unshackling myself from my shyness, with poetry! I have just started writing a few short weeks ago, and I only hope to avoid embarrassing myself ….. whilst camouflaged amongst real poets! I have discovered that I simply … love to write!

  3. fivereflections says:

    thanks for sharing

  4. dragonkatet says:

    Unleash the passionate heart which beats within you, skald. Dragons have passion over-flowing, as you know; it can be felt when reading your words. You have the gift. 🙂 I hope you keep using it.

    • Thank you for such kind words. And for so many eloquent and thoughtful comments! Unleashing of passion might require an unequal balance of direction, caution and trust. For now, Shyness is first cousin to Caution.

  5. What a wonderful graphology and intensity I see. Emotions brim over. So nicely and smoothly like waves on shore.

  6. Heartafire says:

    you have a wonderful and unique gift of expression.

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