Harvest

Honest carver of earth

Harkened to Helios

Hidden summer treasures

Heydays of awned petals

Harvested aurous seeds

Hail each tempered nugget

Humble rewards of ….. Life

Photo from Eyes of a Dragon – Winter Grain Bins
About Eyes of a Dragon

✩      ✫      ✬      ✭      ✮      ✰      ☆

Pleiades:  This titled form was invented in 1999 by Craig Tigerman, Sol Magazine’s Lead Editor. Only one word is allowed in the title followed by a single seven-line stanza. The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title. Hortensia Anderson, a popular haiku and tanka poet, added her own requirement of restricting the line length to six syllables.

Background of the Pleiades: The Pleiades is a star cluster in the constellation Taurus. It is a cluster of stars identified by the ancients, mentioned by Homer in about 750 B.C and Hesiod in about 700 B.C. Six of the stars are readily visible to the naked eye; depending on visibility conditions between nine and twelve stars can be seen. Modern astronomers note that the cluster contains over 500 stars. The ancients named these stars the seven sisters: Alcyone, Asterope, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, and Tygeta; nearby are the clearly visible parents, Atlas and Pleione. The poetic form The Pleiades is aptly named: the seven lines can be said to represent the seven sisters, and the six syllables represent the nearly invisible nature of one sister.

(The above explanation from Shadow Poetry)

Thanks again to Kira at Wrestling Life for introducing me to this and other Poetry Forms.

Previous Pleiades: S, T,

Advertisements

Trials

Tidal memoirs of light

Teeming with elders pride

‘Till lunar rhythms ebb

‘Till solar tempos flow

Time absorbs all passions

Transfer your solitude

Teach us of your patience

Trial Islands Pleiades

Photo from Eyes of a Dragon – Tidal Bloom – Aurora

✩      ✫      ✬      ✭      ✮      ✰      ☆

Pleiades:  This titled form was invented in 1999 by Craig Tigerman, Sol Magazine’s Lead Editor. Only one word is allowed in the title followed by a single seven-line stanza. The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title. Hortensia Anderson, a popular haiku and tanka poet, added her own requirement of restricting the line length to six syllables.

Background of the Pleiades: The Pleiades is a star cluster in the constellation Taurus. It is a cluster of stars identified by the ancients, mentioned by Homer in about 750 B.C and Hesiod in about 700 B.C. Six of the stars are readily visible to the naked eye; depending on visibility conditions between nine and twelve stars can be seen. Modern astronomers note that the cluster contains over 500 stars. The ancients named these stars the seven sisters: Alcyone, Asterope, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, and Tygeta; nearby are the clearly visible parents, Atlas and Pleione. The poetic form The Pleiades is aptly named: the seven lines can be said to represent the seven sisters, and the six syllables represent the nearly invisible nature of one sister.

(The above explanation from Shadow Poetry)

Thanks again to Kira at Wrestling Life for introducing me to this and other Poetry Forms.

Previous Pleiades: S

Stellar

Star dreamt passions awake

surging on twilights ink

stilled, ‘neath dawns folio

secretly etched lost fates

silenced thrum of rapture

straw hearts absorb lost tears

solitary heartbeat

✩      ✫      ✬      ✭      ✮      ✰      ☆

Pleiades:  This titled form was invented in 1999 by Craig Tigerman, Sol Magazine’s Lead Editor. Only one word is allowed in the title followed by a single seven-line stanza. The first word in each line begins with the same letter as the title. Hortensia Anderson, a popular haiku and tanka poet, added her own requirement of restricting the line length to six syllables.

Background of the Pleiades: The Pleiades is a star cluster in the constellation Taurus. It is a cluster of stars identified by the ancients, mentioned by Homer in about 750 B.C and Hesiod in about 700 B.C. Six of the stars are readily visible to the naked eye; depending on visibility conditions between nine and twelve stars can be seen. Modern astronomers note that the cluster contains over 500 stars. The ancients named these stars the seven sisters: Alcyone, Asterope, Celaeno, Electra, Maia, Merope, and Tygeta; nearby are the clearly visible parents, Atlas and Pleione.

The poetic form The Pleiades is aptly named: the seven lines can be said to represent the seven sisters, and the six syllables represent the nearly invisible nature of one sister.

(The above explanation from Shadow Poetry)

Thanks again to Kira at Wrestling Life for introducing me to this and other Poetry Forms.

Feynman